Honey Mead Wine

Mead (/ˈmiːd/; archaic and dialectal “medd”; from Old English “meodu”) is an alcoholic beverage created by fermenting honey with water, sometimes with various fruits, spices, grains, or hops. The alcoholic content ranges from about 8% ABV to more than 20%. The defining characteristic of mead is that the majority of the beverage’s fermentable sugar is derived from honey. It may be still, carbonated, or naturally sparkling; dry, semi-sweet, or sweet.

Mead was produced in ancient history throughout Europe, Africa and Asia.

Mead has played an important role in the beliefs and mythology of some peoples. One such example is the Mead of Poetry, a mead of Norse mythology crafted from the blood of the wise being Kvasir which turns the drinker into a poet or scholar.

The terms “mead” and “honey-wine” often are used synonymously. Some cultures, though, differentiate honey-wine from mead. For example, Hungarians hold that while mead is made of honey, water and beer-yeast (barm), honey-wine is watered honey fermented by recrement of grapes or other fruits.

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Honey Mead Wine
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Course Drinks
Cuisine American, English
Servings
Ingredients
Ingredients
Equipment
Course Drinks
Cuisine American, English
Servings
Ingredients
Ingredients
Equipment
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Add to Meal Plan:
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Instructions
  1. Sterilize all equipment, metal pot, spoon, gallon jug, air lock, etc and clean all counters and lay out a clean towel for equipment.
  2. add honey and about 2 quarts of water to the pot to dissolve over low heat. Stir frequently so as to not let any honey stick on the bottom of pan.
  3. remove from heat and let stand until under 90 degrees F. Use a candy thermometer if you have one, otherwise let cool until it is no longer hot to the touch.
  4. pitch the yeast in a small bowl with about a cup of the dissolved honey liquid. Once the yeast begins to foam or bubble it is ready.
  5. add the dissolved honey, yeast, and another quart of the water to the jug using a funnel.
  6. hold a cap over the mouth of the jug and shake vigorously to aerate the "wort" or contents of the jug.
  7. top off the jug with water so that the contents are about 3 inches from the top.
  8. place air-lock or balloon over the mouth of the jug and place in an area with temperatures between 55-75 degrees F.
  9. Check on daily for the first week and cleanup any over flow that occurs and reset your air-lock
  10. RACKING - after the first month you will need to sterilize your pot and slowly pour contents of jug into pot, being sure not to disturb the yeast on the bottom of the jug. It is best to use a siphon tube. This is called racking.
  11. Once the contents are in the pot clean out the jug and refill with contents of the pot, again pouring slowly as to not aerate the solution.
  12. After about 3 months you will need to add about 1-2 cups of honey to the mix, but be sure to dissolve in water as you did above. This is also the time you would add any flavoring that you desire.
  13. A second RACKING is not required but will help to clear the mead even more.
  14. This can sit for up to a year before you will need to remove the air-lock and either cap the jug or transfer into bottles for storage.
  15. Mead is ready to drink after 6 months, but letting it stand for a full year will bring everything full circle and it will be the best that it will ever be.
  16. Please drink responsibly as this will have an alcohol content between 8%-12% by volume.
Recipe Notes

The ratio for making more mead is 5 lbs of honey per 1 gallon of water, so if you were planning to make a 5 gallon carboy full of mead, you would need 25 lbs of honey.

You can find flavoring extracts in your local brewing store or order from Amazon. Just about anything you can imagine is available as an extract flavor. When using this type of flavoring it is typical to use 15 to 20 drops per gallon. Then taste to see if you need more.

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Travis Toler

Son of James Ivan Toler and Carol Ann Vadeboncoeur Toler

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